Godey's Lady's Book, February 1835

February 1835

RECEIPTS.

FRUITS IMITATING NATURE.

Are made by means of wooden shells; (the color of the stone and containing an almond,) overlapped with an imitation of the Fruit itself, made by means of leaden moulds into which sugar boiled sufficiently has been poured.

When taken from the mould, the sugar is varnished with isinglass; and this last is strewn over with dry colour, to represent the peculiar bloom of the fruit. I should have stated that the isinglass is tinted with liquid colour to represent that of the fruit while it (the isinglass) is dissolving.

CHESTNUTS IN CLARIFIED SUGAR.

Are a favorite little dish. The sugar (2 lbs.) is boiled, and ten yolks of eggs being beaten up with a small quantity of some choice liqueur, these last are added, and the whole is manipulated into a paste, which with powdered sugar, is formed into the appearance of chestnuts; colour them a little where necessary.

FOR SCOURING GRAYS, DRAB COLOURS, FAWNS, MAROONS, AND ALL OTHER COLOURED WOOLLENS, SUCH AS LADIES' PELISSES, MANTLES, COATS, &C.

Supposing the garment to be a coat, take some of the best yellow soap, and cutting it into thin slices, pour upon it a sufficient quantity of water just to moisten it. Then roll it into a ball, and rub all the greasy and dirty spots of the coat with it. Let it dry a little, and then taking warm water, dip your brush in it, and stroke off the soap; if not quite clean, proceed as before, and use your water a little hotter; rinse, at least three times, in two or three buckets or pans of water; the first of these should be blood-warm, or even hotter. Hang to dry, on a clean line.

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