Godey's Lady's Book, November 1835

November 1835

RECEIPTS.

BROWN AND WHITE VERMICELLI SOUPS.

Boil two ounces of vermicelli in three quarts of beef or veal stock, for about twenty minutes; skimming it, and seasoning to palate: this will be sufficient for preparing the common brown vermicelli soup. White vermicelli soup, however, should be made in the following manner: -- Blanch two ounces of vermicelli, in the usual way, by putting it over the fire in cold water; and, on its boiling up, strain it off, and throw it into fresh cold water; for, were it to continue draining in the sieve while hot, it would become lumpy, and not again dissolve. After straining it, when quite cold, dry from the water, boil it in three quarts of veal stock, or broth, for a quarter of an hour; rub it through a tammy; season it to palate; and make a leason of four eggs, and half a pint of boiled cream gradually added, with or without a table-spoon of b├ęchamel. Put the leason to the soup, off the fire, stirring it all the time: then set it on the fire again, to simmer for five minutes; still continually stirring it, as the eggs would otherwise curdle. This is a most delicate and excellent vermicelli soup.

RICH MEAD OR METHEGLIN, EQUAL TO FOREIGN WINE.

The following modern receipt will produce a mead or metheglin fully equal to most of the richest and best foreign wines: - Mix well the whites of six eggs in twelve gallons of water; and, to this mixture, when it has boiled half an hour, and been well scummed, add thirty-six pounds of the finest honey, with two dozen rinds of lemons. Let them boil together some time; and, on the liquid's becoming sufficiently cool, work it with a little ale yeast. Put it, with the  lemon peel, into a seasoned barrel, which must be filled up, as it flows over, with some of the reserved liquor; and, when the hissing ceases, drive the bung close. After the wine has stood five or six months, bottle it off for use. If intended to be kept several years, put in a pound more honey for every gallon of water. This will produce a most luscious, rich, strong, and salubrious wine; possessing, largely, all the best medicinal virtues of honey.

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